Luca's meaningless thoughts  

LDC

by Leandro Lucarella on 2009- 03- 29 18:56 (updated on 2009- 03- 29 18:56)
tagged compiler, d, dgc, en, howto, ldc, llvm - with 0 comment(s)

My original plan was to use GDC as my compiler of choice. This was mainly because DMD is not free and there is a chance that I need to put my hands in the compiler guts.

This was one or two years ago, now the situation has changed a lot. GDC is dead (there was no activity for a long time, and this added to the fact that GCC hacking is hard, it pretty much removes GDC from the scene for me).

OTOH, DMD now provides full source code of the back-end (the front-end was released under the GPL/Artistic licence long ago), but the license is really unclear about what can you do with it. Most of the license mostly tell you how you can never, never, never sue Digital Mars, but about what you can actually do, it's says almost nothing:

The Software is copyrighted and comes with a single user license, and may
not be redistributed. If you wish to obtain a redistribution license,
please contact Digital Mars.

You can't redistribute it, that's for sure. It says nothing about modifications. Anyways, I don't think Walter Bright mind to give me permission to modify it and use it for my personal project, but I prefer to have a software with a better license to work with (and I never was a big fan of Walter's coding either, so =P).

Fortunately there is a new alternative now: LDC. You should know by now that LDC is the DMD front-end code glued to the LLVM back-end, that there is an alpha release (with much of the main functionality finished), that it's completely FLOSS and that it's moving fast and getting better every day (a new release is coming soon too).

I didn't play with LLVM so far, but all I hear about it is that's a nice, easy to learn and work, compiler framework that is widely used, and getting better and better very fast too.

To build LDC just follow the nice instructions (I'm using Debian so I just had to aptitude install cmake cmake-curses-gui llvm-dev libconfig++6-dev mercurial and go directly to the LDC specific part). Now I just have to learn a little about Mercurial (coming from GIT it shouldn't be too hard), and maybe a little about LLVM and I'm good to go.

So LDC is my compiler of choice now. And it should be yours too =)

Collected newsgroup links

by Leandro Lucarella on 2009- 03- 29 04:05 (updated on 2009- 03- 29 04:05)
tagged d, dgc, en, links, wiki - with 0 comment(s)

I've been monitoring and saving interesting (GC related mostly) posts from the D newsgroups. I saved all in a plain text file until today that I decided to add them to a page.

Please feel free to add any missing post that include interesting GC-related discussions.

Thanks!

D GC Benchmark Suite

by Leandro Lucarella on 2009- 03- 28 18:31 (updated on 2009- 03- 28 18:31)
tagged benchmark, d, dgc, en, request - with 0 comment(s)

I'm trying to make a benchmark suite to evaluate different GC implementations.

What I'm looking for is:

Feel free to post trivial test or links to programs projects as comments or via e-mail.

Thanks!

Accurate Garbage Collection in an Uncooperative Environment

by Leandro Lucarella on 2009- 03- 21 20:23 (updated on 2009- 03- 22 03:05)
tagged accurate, d, dgc, en, henderson, paper, tracing, uncooperative environment - with 0 comment(s)

I just read Accurate Garbage Collection in an Uncooperative Environment paper.

Unfortunately this paper try to solve mostly problems D don't see as problems, like portability (targeting languages that emit C code instead of native machine code, like the Mercury language mentioned in the paper). Based on the problem of tracing the C stack in a portable way, it suggests to inject some code to functions to construct a linked list of stack information (which contains local variables information) to be able to trace the stack in an accurate way.

I think none of the ideas presented by this paper are suitable for D, because the GC already can trace the stack in D (in an unportable way, but it can), and it can get the type info from better places too.

In terms of (time) performance, benchmarks shows that is a little worse than Boehm (et al) GC, but they argue that Boehm has years of fine grained optimizations and it's tightly coupled with the underlying architecture while this new approach is almost unoptimized yet and it's completely portable.

The only thing it mentions that could apply to D (and any conservative GC in general) is the issues that compiler optimizations can introduce. But I'm not aware of any of this issues, so I can't say anything about it.

In case you wonder, I've added this paper to my papers playground page =)

Update

I think I missed the point with this paper. Current D GC can't possibly do accurate tracing of the stack, because there is no way to get a type info from there (I was thinking only in the heap, where some degree of accuracy is achieved by setting the noscan bit for a bin that don't have pointers, as mentioned in my previous post).

So this paper could help getting accurate GC into D, but it doesn't seems a great deal when you can add type information about local variables when emitting machine code instead of adding the shadow stack linked list. The only advantage I see is that I think it should be possible to implement the linked list in the front-end.